39 Professional Development

Your education as a historian does not end with the degree (whether BA, MA, or PhD)

If you become a teacher at any level, you will continue your education with professional development. If you are utilizing your degree as an archivist, preservationist, or in government or the private sector, you will want to keep abreast of key issues. The best place to start is with the American Historical Association

Lifted directly from their website (because we couldn’t have said it better ourselves 😉 is the following descriptive information:

The American Historical Association is a nonprofit membership organization founded in 1884 and incorporated by Congress in 1889 for the promotion of historical studies. The AHA provides leadership for the discipline by protecting academic freedom, developing professional standards, supporting scholarship and innovative teaching, and helping to sustain and enhance the work of historians. As the largest organization of professional historians in the world, the AHA represents more than 12,000 members and serves historians representing every historical period and geographical area in a wide variety of professions.

The AHA is a trusted voice for history education, the professional work of historians, and the critical role of historical thinking in public life. Learn more about our work on behalf of the entire discipline and connect with the staff that is dedicated to advancing history and historical thinking for the benefit of all.

The American Historical Association is the largest professional organization serving historians in all fields and all professions. The AHA is a trusted voice advocating for history education, the professional work of historians, and the critical role of historical thinking in public life.

Peruse the website’s section on jobs and professional development to see the scope of what is available

The AHA is just one of many sources for professional development. For teachers at all levels there are the National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Institutes and Digital Humanities Workshops:

These are just a few options. And don’t forget about other skills (like online course design or pedagogy workshops or GIS) that may be useful to your job as a historian in the field or in academia.

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How History is Made: A Student's Guide to Reading, Writing, and Thinking in the Discipline by Stephanie Cole; Kimberly Breuer; Scott W. Palmer; and Brandon Blakeslee is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License, except where otherwise noted.

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